Three Insights on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion that may just change the way you think

GPTW ANZ

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The “Towards a Future of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion” webinar offered a glimpse into how Australian leaders are tackling the complexities of change and working towards creating a more inclusive environment. Esteemed guests, such as Mary Hogg from Hilton Hotels, Karen Clancy from Specsavers, and Brian Reeves from UKG, shared valuable perspectives and actionable strategies that delve deeper into the DEI initiatives.

1. Trust is at the heart of a thriving workplace 

Brian Reeves delved into the fundamental aspects that make a workplace tolerable and exceptional. He emphasised the importance of genuine connections between colleagues, where trust, pride, and camaraderie drive professional relationships beyond mere job titles. The goal is to create an environment where everyone feels like an integral part of the team, regardless of their background. Karen Clancy echoed this sentiment, highlighting how the team’s passion and dedication create a workplace that feels more like a community than a job.

Mary Hogg shared Hilton Hotels’ recipe for success, earning them the World’s Best Workplace distinction in 2023. She stressed the significance of persistence, values-driven leadership, and genuine buy-in at every level. Mary emphasised that diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) are not just checkbox activities but core business strategies crucial for sustainable growth. Hilton Hotels’ approach embeds DEI into the organisation’s DNA, making it a shared vision everyone is committed to achieving, not just a top-down directive.

2. Discover the value in disorder  

The journey towards genuine inclusivity is not linear but rather a winding path with unforeseen obstacles. Mary wisely suggests that we should welcome the chaos and lean into the inherent discomfort in true DEI efforts. This requires a willingness to challenge established norms, appreciate diversity, and welcome a range of viewpoints that may sometimes collide but ultimately lead to more dynamic and inventive results. It is about acknowledging that the process may be challenging, but the rewards are immeasurable for those who are willing to embark on the journey.

3. Amplify voices that we don’t often hear 

A key theme was the power of giving a platform to diverse voices within an organisation. Karen Clancy drew attention to the significance of diversity and inclusion groups, which serve as a platform for a more extensive range of individuals to express their thoughts and ideas. These groups can function as a miniature representation of society, highlighting issues and perspectives that might otherwise remain unnoticed. Additionally, they foster a sense of belonging and emphasise that every employee possesses valuable insights regardless of their background or position.

Some other nuggets of wisdom

Brian Reeves added a layer of strategy to the conversation, pointing to the Great Place To Work Trust Index as a crucial tool for gauging the effectiveness of DEI initiatives. “Start over at every level asking questions,” he recommended, advocating for a culture of continuous feedback and adaptation. This approach ensures that DEI efforts are not static but evolve in response to the changing dynamics of the workforce and the broader societal context.

Continuous dialogue is key, as Karen Clancy highlights. Cultivating an inclusive workplace culture is an iterative process that demands active listening, learning, and adapting based on the insights of those who experience the workplace firsthand. Organisations can transform their intentions into meaningful actions that truly impact employees’ lives by prioritising ongoing communication and remaining receptive to change.

 

The webinar concluded with a powerful call to action: start small, actively listen, and continuously engage. Stuart Elliott eloquently summarised the essence of the webinar, emphasising the importance of listening to participants and employees. This journey towards creating an inclusive workplace culture is not just about policies but also requires patience, commitment, and a willingness to explore uncharted territories. The insights from the “Towards a Future of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion” webinar are invaluable for businesses navigating complex social issues. By embracing the experiences and strategies shared by these leaders, organisations can pave their own paths towards more dynamic, equitable, and inclusive workplaces where every individual can thrive. This journey is about enriching our workplaces, communities, and society, one step at a time.

GPTW ANZ

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Great Place To Work® Best Workplaces™ in Australia 2023 Evaluation Methodology

Great Place To Work determines the list using our proprietary For All methodology. To determine the Best Workplaces in Technology list, Great Place To Work analyses the survey responses of tens of thousands of employees from Great Place To Work Certified™ companies in the technology industry.

Our survey enables employees to share confidential quantitative and qualitative feedback about their organization’s culture by responding to 60 statements on a 5-point scale and answering two open-ended questions. Collectively, these statements describe a great employee experience, defined by high levels of trust, respect, credibility, fairness, pride, and camaraderie. In addition, companies provide organizational data like size, location, industry, demographics, roles, and levels. Great Place To Work measures the differences in survey responses across demographic groups and roles within each organization to assess both the quality and consistency of the employee experience.

Statements are weighted according to their relevance in describing the most important aspects of an equitable workplace. Survey data analysis and company-provided datapoints are then factored into a combined score to compare and rank the companies that create the most consistently positive experience for all employees in this industry.

To be considered for the list, companies must be Great Place To Work Certified™ and nominate as a company in the technology industry.

We require statistically significant survey results, review anomalies in responses, news, and financial performance, and investigate any employee reports of company incompliance with strict surveying rules to validate the integrity of the results and findings. 

Great Place To Work® Best Workplaces for Women™ List Methodology

The Best Workplaces for Women™list is determined using Great Place To Work’sFor All™methodology to evaluate hundreds of Certified™Great Place To Work®organisations across Australia.   

Data is based on over 40,000 employee survey responses from women in Great Place To Work® Certified™ organisations across Australia. 

The survey 

The survey enables employees to share confidential quantitative and qualitative feedback about their organisation’s culture by responding to 60 statements on a 5-point scale and answering two open-ended questions. 

Collectively, these statements describe a great employee experience, defined by high levels of trust, respect, credibility, fairness, pride, and camaraderie. In addition, companies provide organisational data like size, location, industry, and the number of women in the workforce and management positions. 

Considerations 

Great Place To Work analysed the gender balance of each workplace, how it compares to each company’s industry, and patterns in representation as women rise from front-line positions to executive/C-suite roles. 
Survey data analysis and women’s representation figures are then factored into a combined score to compare and rank the companies that create the most consistently positive experience and opportunities for all women, regardless of their role or demographic background.   

Eligibility   

To be considered for the list, companies must be Great Place To Work Certified™. Companies must also employ at least 50 women. We require statistically significant survey results, review anomalies in responses, and investigate any employee reports of company in compliance with strict surveying rules to validate the integrity of the results and findings. 

Please note this list is NOT ranked. 

Great Place To Work® Best Workplaces™ in Australia 2023 Evaluation Methodology

Great Place To Work, the global authority on workplace culture, determined the Best Workplaces™ Australia 2023 List by conducting annual workforce studies through our Trust Index Survey™ and Culture Management platform Emprising®, representing the voices of almost 50,000 employees across Australia.

Employees responded to over 60 survey questions describing the extent to which their organisation creates a great place to work For All™, meaning that the company empowers all individuals to reach their full human potential. Eighty-five percent of the evaluation is based on what employees report about their experiences of trust and reaching their full human potential as part of their organisation, no matter who they are or what they do. We analyse these experiences relative to each organisation’s size, workforce make up, and what’s typical in their industry and region. The remainder of the evaluation is an assessment of all employees’ daily experiences of the company’s values, people’s ability to contribute new ideas, and the effectiveness of their leaders to ensure they’re consistently experienced.

To ensure surveys truly represent all employees, we require enough people in each organisation to respond that results are accurate to a 95% confidence level and 5% margin of error or better. We review any anomalies in survey responses, news and financial performance to ensure there aren’t any extraordinary reasons to believe we couldn’t trust a company’s survey results.

 

Categories

These organisations’ assessment is based 100% on employee responses to the Trust Index survey.

For larger organisations with more than 100 employees, we also use our Culture Audit™ tool, asking organisations to share with us their practices, policies and programs to creating a great workplace For All™ and evaluating the approach they take.

Why do you say in one place your national list scoring is based on 85%/15% and in another place that it is 75%/25%?

We are explaining two different things:

1.  The criteria we evaluate

2.  Where the data comes from