Diversity & inclusion scorecard: how does your organisation stack up?

Samantha Huddle

Author

It’s not often we take time to take stock and think about how far Australia has come in terms of understanding and respecting the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion to our workplaces.

But there’s little doubt the workplace of today is vastly different from even the recent past.

We spoke to Lisa Annese, chief executive officer of the Diversity Council of Australia, to hear where Australian workplaces are up to on the road to true diversity and inclusion — and to understand what more needs to be done.

The Diversity Council is a member-based not-for-profit with more than 1000 member companies who between them employ some 20 per cent of the Australian workforce.

And its report card — by and large — is positive.

“Australian organisations understand diversity and are committed to it — that has not always been the case,” says Annese.

“What we have in Australia is an awful lot of organisations who are really committed to creating diverse and inclusive workplaces because they understand that it’s good for their business.”

“They understand their shareholders expect it, their clients and customers expect it, that there are government regulations that are asking them questions about it and that it materially influences their ability to function, do business and attract and retain talent.”

Great Place to Work® research shows the importance of diversity and inclusion:

  • higher revenue growth
  • increased ability to recruit
  • higher employee retention.

Australia is one of the few countries where 30 per cent of board positions of the largest listed companies are held by women. There is however, still work to do to improve this figure as we continue to push toward 50 per cent.

“We’re seeing more and more women moving through the pipeline into more senior levels of management,” says Annese.

“We’re seeing more and more men understand that workplace flexibility is an important part of their work-life commitment and has benefits for their well-being and their connection to their children.

“More and more companies have Reconciliation Action Plans, where they’re trying to engage with their indigenous employees or potential employees.
“And look at Mardi Gras — if you were there 20 years ago it was a vastly different place. Now you’ve got corporates with floats for their employees and Pride networks in their organisations.”

So are we there yet?

Not quite, says Annese.

For starters, improvements in board gender diversity do not represent equity because senior roles are still not representative of the gender balance in lower-level roles or representative of the wider Australian population as a whole.

In industries like law and finance, women have long been a majority of graduates but remain underrepresented at management level.

Worse, some important markers of inclusion have a long way to go.

“We still see workplaces where sexual harassment is rife — one in three people have experienced workplace sexual harassment,” says Annese.

“We know there’s a deficit of women in leadership and a gender pay gap, and that women are over-represented in insecure employment and have a deficit in their retirement savings.

“We know men face significant obstacles when they try to become primary carers of their children and that this can have significant implications for their careers.

“We have a major lack of cultural and racial diversity in leadership of our biggest organisations and we still don’t see First Nations peoples represented in leadership, nor people with visible disabilities.

“So, there’s still a long way to go.”

 

Samantha Huddle

Author

CTA GOES HERE

Great Place To Work® Best Workplaces™ in Australia 2023 Evaluation Methodology

Great Place To Work determines the list using our proprietary For All methodology. To determine the Best Workplaces in Technology list, Great Place To Work analyses the survey responses of tens of thousands of employees from Great Place To Work Certified™ companies in the technology industry.

Our survey enables employees to share confidential quantitative and qualitative feedback about their organization’s culture by responding to 60 statements on a 5-point scale and answering two open-ended questions. Collectively, these statements describe a great employee experience, defined by high levels of trust, respect, credibility, fairness, pride, and camaraderie. In addition, companies provide organizational data like size, location, industry, demographics, roles, and levels. Great Place To Work measures the differences in survey responses across demographic groups and roles within each organization to assess both the quality and consistency of the employee experience.

Statements are weighted according to their relevance in describing the most important aspects of an equitable workplace. Survey data analysis and company-provided datapoints are then factored into a combined score to compare and rank the companies that create the most consistently positive experience for all employees in this industry.

To be considered for the list, companies must be Great Place To Work Certified™ and nominate as a company in the technology industry.

We require statistically significant survey results, review anomalies in responses, news, and financial performance, and investigate any employee reports of company incompliance with strict surveying rules to validate the integrity of the results and findings. 

Great Place To Work® Best Workplaces for Women™ List Methodology

The Best Workplaces for Women™list is determined using Great Place To Work’sFor All™methodology to evaluate hundreds of Certified™Great Place To Work®organisations across Australia.   

Data is based on over 40,000 employee survey responses from women in Great Place To Work® Certified™ organisations across Australia. 

The survey 

The survey enables employees to share confidential quantitative and qualitative feedback about their organisation’s culture by responding to 60 statements on a 5-point scale and answering two open-ended questions. 

Collectively, these statements describe a great employee experience, defined by high levels of trust, respect, credibility, fairness, pride, and camaraderie. In addition, companies provide organisational data like size, location, industry, and the number of women in the workforce and management positions. 

Considerations 

Great Place To Work analysed the gender balance of each workplace, how it compares to each company’s industry, and patterns in representation as women rise from front-line positions to executive/C-suite roles. 
Survey data analysis and women’s representation figures are then factored into a combined score to compare and rank the companies that create the most consistently positive experience and opportunities for all women, regardless of their role or demographic background.   

Eligibility   

To be considered for the list, companies must be Great Place To Work Certified™. Companies must also employ at least 50 women. We require statistically significant survey results, review anomalies in responses, and investigate any employee reports of company in compliance with strict surveying rules to validate the integrity of the results and findings. 

Please note this list is NOT ranked. 

Great Place To Work® Best Workplaces™ in Australia 2023 Evaluation Methodology

Great Place To Work, the global authority on workplace culture, determined the Best Workplaces™ Australia 2023 List by conducting annual workforce studies through our Trust Index Survey™ and Culture Management platform Emprising®, representing the voices of almost 50,000 employees across Australia.

Employees responded to over 60 survey questions describing the extent to which their organisation creates a great place to work For All™, meaning that the company empowers all individuals to reach their full human potential. Eighty-five percent of the evaluation is based on what employees report about their experiences of trust and reaching their full human potential as part of their organisation, no matter who they are or what they do. We analyse these experiences relative to each organisation’s size, workforce make up, and what’s typical in their industry and region. The remainder of the evaluation is an assessment of all employees’ daily experiences of the company’s values, people’s ability to contribute new ideas, and the effectiveness of their leaders to ensure they’re consistently experienced.

To ensure surveys truly represent all employees, we require enough people in each organisation to respond that results are accurate to a 95% confidence level and 5% margin of error or better. We review any anomalies in survey responses, news and financial performance to ensure there aren’t any extraordinary reasons to believe we couldn’t trust a company’s survey results.

 

Categories

These organisations’ assessment is based 100% on employee responses to the Trust Index survey.

For larger organisations with more than 100 employees, we also use our Culture Audit™ tool, asking organisations to share with us their practices, policies and programs to creating a great workplace For All™ and evaluating the approach they take.

Why do you say in one place your national list scoring is based on 85%/15% and in another place that it is 75%/25%?

We are explaining two different things:

1.  The criteria we evaluate

2.  Where the data comes from